Upcoming Events
  • Breast Cancer Awareness Day
    October 24, 2014

    Wichita and Affiliated Tribes to host a Breast Cancer Awareness Day.  Please click here for the flyer. 

  • AoA Thanksgiving Dinner
    November 20, 2014

    The AoA Program will have its Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, November 20, 2014.  More details will be available at a later date. 

  • AoA Christmas Dinner
    December 18, 2014

    The AoA Program will have its Christmas Dinner on Thursday, December 18, 2014. More details will be available as the date approaches. 

  • Juvenile Services-Logo Contest
    November 14, 2014

    Deadline for submission for Juvenile Logo Contest.

Wichita Language
ha:kwicis
money
More Wichita Words
October 2014
Previous MonthNext Month
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
Wichita Tribes Blog
  • Tribe Receives Funding for Wichita History Center
    October 16, 2014 10:09 PM

    The Housing and Urban Development Agency has issued the Notice Of Funding Awards for fiscal year 2014 for the Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) program. The Wichita and Affiliated Tribes has been awarded $800,000.00 to construct the Wichita Historical Center to be built north of Anadarko, Oklahoma as discussed in previous newsletters. The center […]

  • Wichita Housing Authority-Vacancies
    October 1, 2014 12:12 PM

    Maintenance Worker Small household repairs such as changing switches and receptacles, faucets, evaluating HVAC units and furnaces. Repairs of holes in walls and changing out damaged doors. Includes roof shingle corrections from storm damages. Grounds maintenance include. Presently have two openings. Salary depends on former experience $10 to $12.50 per hour. Security Officer Must be […]

  • WCEP Schedules Beadworking Workshop
    September 17, 2014 9:48 PM

    The Wichita Cultural Education Program (WCEP) will be sponsoring a Beadworking Workshop on September 28, 2014. The workshop will be held from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM at the Portable Building, Wichita Tribal Complex which is located one mile north of Anadarko on Hwy. 281 and one half mile west on Wichita Lane. Participation is […]


  • September 15, 2014 2:47 PM

  • WCEP Schedules Archery Workshop For Wichita Youth
    September 15, 2014 2:46 PM

    The Wichita Cultural Education Program (WCEP) will be sponsoring an Archery Workshop at 1:00 PM on September 20, 2014. The instructor will be Mr. Kenneth Stephenson. Mr. Stephenson is an accomplished archer who has given demonstrations and participated in archery competitions for many years. The workshop will be held at the Portable building, Wichita Tribal […]


  • September 10, 2014 12:00 PM

  •  VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT-Case Management Aide/Office Assistant
    September 10, 2014 11:59 AM

    The Wichita and Affiliated Tribes has an opening for a Case Management Aide/Office Assistant. Provides administrative support for the Indian Child Welfare programs; monitors budget expenditures; conducts intake interviews; performs homevisits; and manages supervised visitations. Qualifications:  Prefer Associates Degree in Sociology, Psychology, or related field and at least 3 years of general clerical and case […]

  • Wichita Child Development Center-5th Anniversary-09.13.14
    September 8, 2014 10:47 AM

  • Breast Cancer Awareness Event
    September 7, 2014 7:25 PM

  • SCC-Job Postings-09.05.14
    September 7, 2014 7:23 PM

In the Beginning: 1540-1750

"Wichita Memories" portrays the culture and history of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes, whose ancestors have lived in the Central and Southern Plains since prehistoric times. These once numerous people are known to historians as the Wichitas, Wacos, Taovayas, Tawakonis, and Kichais.

"After the man and woman were made they dreamed that things were made for them, and when they woke they had the things of which they had dreamed . . . The woman was given an ear of corn . . . It was to be the food of the people that should exist in the future, to be used generation after generation." - Tawakoni Jim in The Mythology of the Wichita, 1904

Wichita legends tell us that the history of their people forms a cycle. With the world's creation, the gifts of corn and the bow and arrow were bestowed upon the people by the spirits of the first man and woman, Morning Star and the Moon. The cycle is complete with the days of darkness, when the earth becomes barren. Just as disaster seems eminent, the cycle begins again and the world is renewed through the new creation.

Archaeologists believe that the heritage of the Wichitas may be traced back at least 800 years to the Washita River culture of central and western Oklahoma. Living along fertile valleys, these people resided in small villages of rectangular, mud plastered houses. Nearby were small gardens where women tilled and weeded corn, beans, and squash with hoes of buffalo leg and shoulder bones. Buffalo, elk, deer, and small game were hunted. Wild plants were collected for foods, medicines, and rituals. Tools were made from readily available stone, wood, bone, and antler. Between A.D. 1350 and 1450, some Washita River people began to build larger villages with circular grass houses, some of which were fortified. Others apparently moved northward to the Great Bend of the Arkansas, a land known to later Spanish explorers as Quivira.

When first encountered by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in 1541, the Quiviran ancestors of the Wichitas were following a way of life that continued into the eighteenth century. Near their large grass house villages, women tilled their gardens while the men hunted buffalo and other game. Trade was extensive and included commodities such as glazed paint pottery, turquoise pendants, and shell beads from the Puebloan villages of New Mexico as well as bois d'arc and engraved pottery from Caddo settlements of northeastern Texas.

With the Spanish settlement of New Mexico and the arrival of French hunters and traders in the Mississippi Valley, the lives of the Wichita were profoundly affected. By acquiring horses from the Spanish colonies, the Wichitas were to follow herds of buffalo over a much wider range and to hunt them more efficiently. From the French towns in Louisiana, metal hoes, guns, and buckets reached the Wichitas. In some cases, these goods were used by the Wichitas in their own daily tasks. However, others were used to maintain or establish trading ties with such recently arrived Southern Plains peoples as the Comanches.

Next: People of the Grass House