Upcoming Events
  • 2016 High School Senior Assistance
    Spring 2016

    Enrolled Wichita Tribal members in their senior year of high school may qualify. For more information, see the flyer, or contact the education department at 405-247-8612.

  • Wichita Language Classes for Children
    Sundays at 2:00 p.m.

    Language classes are being held on Sundays at 2:00 p.m.  

  • Summer Youth Camp
    Apply by May 6, 2016

    This camp will be for boys and girls ages 6-12 years old. This is for enrolled Wichita members. This overnight camp will have activities such as fishing, swimming, athletics, cultural arts and crafts, culture lessons, and storytelling. Each camper will be provided an individual tent, sleeping bag, pillow, hygiene bag, flashlight, tackle box, and fishing pole. They will be able to take these items home with them at the end of camp. Campers will be dropped off Tuesday, May 31st @ 8AM and picked up Friday, June 3rd by 5PM. Please note for the overnight camp that we will ask that if your camper becomes homesick and asks to go home, that you make sure that you are available to do so. More information will be provided at a later date.

     

    Applications for the summer camp are available now. The applications will be due May 6th.A copy of the participant's CDIB is required.No late submissions will be accepted. 

  • Summer Youth Program
    June 6- July 29, 2016

    This program will run from June 6th-July 29th. MONDAY-THURSDAY. You will be able to drop your camper off at 8AM Monday-Thursday, and pick them up by 5PM each day. Daily activities will include cultural arts and crafts, cultural lessons, storytelling, and athletics. Through the summer program we will take weekly field trips as well. Consent forms and more information will be sent home before each trip.

     

    Applications for the summer camp/program are available now. The applications will be due May 6th.A copy of the participant's CDIB is required.No late submissions will be accepted.

     

  • Annual General Council Meeting
    July 16, 2016

    Mark your calendars.  More information TBA. 

  • 2016 Tribal Elections
    July 16, 2016

    Elections will be held for all 7 positions on the Wichita Executive Committee.  More information will be announced at a later date. Mark your calendars to participate in the 2016 elections. 

  • Annual Dance
    August 11-14, 2016

    Wichita Annual Dance is scheduled for August 11-14, 2016. Mark your calendars. More information to be provided at a later date. 

Wichita Language
kiyáta:wʔa
eight
More Wichita Words
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Wichita Tribes Blog
  • 14th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair
    April 20, 2016 1:03 PM

  • Community Visioning Meeting for Enrolled Tribal Members
    April 14, 2016 4:01 PM

    Saturday, April 30, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. in the Community Building located at the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes  Lunch will be provided. There will also be door prizes available. The Wichita and Affiliated Tribes Executive Committee will hold a one day Community Visioning Session to gain tribal community input on the economic development vision, community priorities […]

  • Lawton IHS Centennial
    April 14, 2016 3:46 PM

    Lawton Indian Hospital will be celebrating 100 years on this date with reception to follow. More information can be found in the flyer.

  • Elder Informational Meeting
    April 14, 2016 3:45 PM

    Information from different entities providing services for elders will be available at this informational session. Meal provided. More information on this event can be found in the flyer.

  • JOM Honor Dance 2016
    April 14, 2016 3:44 PM

    JOM student awards will be presented at this event, along with a meal and honor dance.

  • Land Buy Back Program
    March 9, 2016 4:29 PM

    The Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members. There are […]

  • Circuit Training
    February 19, 2016 8:37 AM

  • Great American Cleanup
    February 18, 2016 3:21 PM

  • 2016 High School Senior Assistance
    February 18, 2016 3:17 PM

  • Wichita Community Garden
    February 18, 2016 2:47 PM

In the Beginning: 1540-1750

"Wichita Memories" portrays the culture and history of the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes, whose ancestors have lived in the Central and Southern Plains since prehistoric times. These once numerous people are known to historians as the Wichitas, Wacos, Taovayas, Tawakonis, and Kichais.

"After the man and woman were made they dreamed that things were made for them, and when they woke they had the things of which they had dreamed . . . The woman was given an ear of corn . . . It was to be the food of the people that should exist in the future, to be used generation after generation." - Tawakoni Jim in The Mythology of the Wichita, 1904

Wichita legends tell us that the history of their people forms a cycle. With the world's creation, the gifts of corn and the bow and arrow were bestowed upon the people by the spirits of the first man and woman, Morning Star and the Moon. The cycle is complete with the days of darkness, when the earth becomes barren. Just as disaster seems eminent, the cycle begins again and the world is renewed through the new creation.

Archaeologists believe that the heritage of the Wichitas may be traced back at least 800 years to the Washita River culture of central and western Oklahoma. Living along fertile valleys, these people resided in small villages of rectangular, mud plastered houses. Nearby were small gardens where women tilled and weeded corn, beans, and squash with hoes of buffalo leg and shoulder bones. Buffalo, elk, deer, and small game were hunted. Wild plants were collected for foods, medicines, and rituals. Tools were made from readily available stone, wood, bone, and antler. Between A.D. 1350 and 1450, some Washita River people began to build larger villages with circular grass houses, some of which were fortified. Others apparently moved northward to the Great Bend of the Arkansas, a land known to later Spanish explorers as Quivira.

When first encountered by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in 1541, the Quiviran ancestors of the Wichitas were following a way of life that continued into the eighteenth century. Near their large grass house villages, women tilled their gardens while the men hunted buffalo and other game. Trade was extensive and included commodities such as glazed paint pottery, turquoise pendants, and shell beads from the Puebloan villages of New Mexico as well as bois d'arc and engraved pottery from Caddo settlements of northeastern Texas.

With the Spanish settlement of New Mexico and the arrival of French hunters and traders in the Mississippi Valley, the lives of the Wichita were profoundly affected. By acquiring horses from the Spanish colonies, the Wichitas were to follow herds of buffalo over a much wider range and to hunt them more efficiently. From the French towns in Louisiana, metal hoes, guns, and buckets reached the Wichitas. In some cases, these goods were used by the Wichitas in their own daily tasks. However, others were used to maintain or establish trading ties with such recently arrived Southern Plains peoples as the Comanches.

Next: People of the Grass House