Upcoming Events
  • Employee Weight Loss Challenge
    2/11/15-3/25/15

    The staff of the Wichita and Affiliated tribes and its enterprises are working toward a healthier personnel with the incentive of an employee weight loss challenge. More information about this can be found in this flyer

  • Native Teen Dance
    February 20, 2015

    The Wichita and Affiliated Tribes-Domestic Family Violence Program will host a Native Teen Dance on February 20, 2015.  For more information, see the flyer attached here

  • Family Style Bingo
    February 28, 2015

    The Wichita Service Club will host a Family Style Bingo on Saturday, February 28, 2015 at the Community Building on the tribal complex. For more information, please see the flyer attached here

  • Honor the Child Day
    April 23, 2015

    "Honor the Child Day"

    Parade & Children's Celebration

    April 23, 2015

    8:45 AM to 2:00 PM

    Beginning on E. Broadway & Ending At Oklahoma Street Junior High School Gym

    * Parade * KID-I-D-Kits * Moon bounce * *Cultural Educational Activities* Information Booths*

    Petting Zoo * Pony Rides * Face Painting* Children's Train Rides

    Ages 6 & Under are welcome!

    Prior Registration is necessary to receive accurate lunch count.

    Lunch & T-Shirts are provided.

    Information : 247-8621

    See the flyer here.

  • 2015 Annual General Council Meeting
    July 18, 2015

    2015 Annual General Council Meeting will be held on Saturday, July 18, 2015. More details to be posted later. 

  • Annual Dance
    August 13 – 16, 2015

    The Annual Dance this year will be August 13 - 16, 2015. More details to come.

Wichita Language
te:saʔa
Caddo
More Wichita Words
February 2015
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Wichita Tribes Blog
  • Job Application Class today!
    February 12, 2015 9:45 AM

  • Informational Meeting for Elders in the Community
    January 13, 2015 4:01 PM

  • Seeking Tribal Administrator
    January 13, 2015 12:15 PM

    The Wichita and Affiliated Tribes has an opening for the position of a Tribal Administrator. Under the supervision of the Wichita Executive Committee, position is responsible for the daily administration and overall operation of Tribal Programs. DUTIES: Responsible for the efficient operation of all tribal programs, submission of proposals for funding and implementation of the […]

  • Heart Health Awareness Day
    January 13, 2015 10:00 AM

  • NON-SMOKING POLICY BEGINS JANUARY 1, 2015
    December 30, 2014 10:29 PM

    On November 24, 2014, the Wichita Executive Committee, by a vote of 6-0-0, approved the Non-Smoking Policy for the Wichita Tribal Complex to be effective on January 1, 2015. The use of tobacco for traditional ceremonial purposes is exempt from this policy.

  • Certified Healthy Business
    December 30, 2014 10:28 PM

    On December 23, 2014, the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes received notification that it met the criteria of a Healthy Business. There are three levels of certification that include: basic, merit and excellence. Last year the Tribe received a Certificate of Merit. This year the Tribe earned a Certificate of Excellence. An awards luncheon will be […]


  • December 30, 2014 10:27 PM

  • New Year’s Eve Watch Scheduled
    December 29, 2014 10:45 AM

    The Wichita Little Sisters and the Wichita Young Men’s Society are sponsoring a New Year’s Eve Watch Night on December 31, 2014 at the newly renovated Wichita Community Building, Wichita Tribal Complex which is located one mile north of Anadarko on Hwy. 281 and one half mile west on Wichita Lane. The evening will begin […]

  • AoA Thanksgiving Dinner
    November 20, 2014 11:16 AM

    The elder Thanksgiving Dinner will begin at 11:40. All Native Americans aged 55 or older and their spouses, regardless of age, are eligible to come and enjoy this meal. See you there !

  • Bi Annual Health Screening
    November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

    Tomorrow!             Friday, November 14, 2014 10:30 am-1:00 pm at the Wichita Tribal Complex Community Building located 1.25 miles north on Hwy 281 in Anadarko. Flu shots will be available for Native Americans ages 18 and over, and will be administered by the AIHC Public Health Nurse. Screenings will be provided […]

Days of Darkness: 1820-1934

"Generation after generation the corn was to be used. And if the time should come that they planted corn and something else than corn came up, it would be a sign that the end of the world was at hand." - Tawakoni Jim in The Mythology of the Wichita, 1904

Although European settlements introduced new types of goods to the Wichitas, they also brought highly contagious diseases. At the same time, hostilities increased as eastern tribes were removed to Indian Territory. As such turmoil cast a lengthening shadow over the land, the Wichitas lost many people. In 1820, the once populous Wichitas, Wacos, Tawakonis, Taovayas, and Kichais were estimated at no more than 1400 persons. Truly the "days of darkness" had begun.

This trend continued even with the signing of the first American-Wichita treaty at Camp Holmes in 1835. There can be no doubt about the sincerity of the Wichitas who persuaded their Comanche allies to attend and sign this agreement which recognized their right to their traditional homeland. This treaty also contains the first official usage of the name "Wichita" for the Wichita, Waco, and Tawakoni people.

After the Texas Republic was established in 1836, the Wichitas were forced to defend their lands against the intrusions of white settlers. Not until 1855, after Texas joined the United States, was a reservation for the Wichitas established on the Brazos River. However, continued hostilities from neighboring settlers led to the Wichita removal from Texas to lands on the Washita River. There they joined their northern relatives in what is now west-central Oklahoma.

Although a reservation and agency were established, the Wichita people were not able to remain in this land. In 1863, they were forced by Confederate troops to leave their reservation and flee north to Kansas. While in Kansas from 1863 to 1867, the Wichitas had no land to farm and few friends to help them in their time of trouble. Many people starved. Others suffered from smallpox and cholera epidemics that swept through their villages. Only 822 people returned to Indian Territory in 1867.

Traditional Wichita religion encompassed a belief in the supernatural powers of elements of the earth and the sky. Animals often appeared to men in dreams or revelations to become lifelong guardian spirits.

Once settled on the reservation, some became members of the churches established by Christian missionaries. Others turned to the peyote religion, later chartered as the Native American Church, which combined elements of traditional and Christian beliefs. Many Wichitas took up the Ghost Dance religion of the 1890's. They believed in the prophecy of Wovoka, a Paiute from Walker Lake, Nevada. According to Wovoka, people would be reunited with their dead friends and relatives in a land of plentiful game where there would be neither sickness nor death.

Government agents worked to destroy the Ghost Dance religion as well as other elements of Wichita culture. Children were placed in boarding schools where they were forbidden to speak their own language. Even the reservation established in 1872 was not to remain theirs. Led by Tawakoni Jim, the Wichita resisted the breaking up of their assigned lands. However, in 1900 their reservation was divided into allotments of 160 acres per person with the remainder declared "surplus lands" and opened to settlement. Allotment brought about the final destruction of the Wichitas' grass house villages and their communal way of life.

Next: A New Beginning